First Lines Fridays

first-lines-fridays

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

 

Oops, I forgot to schedule this and just realized it was still a draft! :/

 


“No one had seen her naked until her death. It was a rule of the order that the Sisters should not look on human flesh, neither their own nor anyone else’s.


 

Interested? Keep reading to find out which book this is from.

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The Birth of Venus by Sarah Dunant

28078
What it’s about:

Alessandra Cecchi is not quite fifteen when her father, a prosperous cloth merchant, brings a young painter back from northern Europe to decorate the chapel walls in the family’s Florentine palazzo. A child of the Renaissance, with a precocious mind and a talent for drawing, Alessandra is intoxicated by the painter’s abilities.

But their burgeoning relationship is interrupted when Alessandra’s parents arrange her marriage to a wealthy, much older man. Meanwhile, Florence is changing, increasingly subject to the growing suppression imposed by the fundamentalist monk Savonarola, who is seizing religious and political control. Alessandra and her native city are caught between the Medici state, with its love of luxury, learning, and dazzling art, and the hellfire preaching and increasing violence of Savonarola’s reactionary followers. Played out against this turbulent backdrop, Alessandra’s married life is a misery, except for the surprising freedom it allows her to pursue her powerful attraction to the young painter and his art.

The Birth of Venus is a tour de force, the first historical novel from one of Britain’s most innovative writers of literary suspense. It brings alive the history of Florence at its most dramatic period, telling a compulsively absorbing story of love, art, religion, and power through the passionate voice of Alessandra, a heroine with the same vibrancy of spirit as her beloved city.

Goodreads | Amazon | Book Depository | Barnes & Noble


This has been sitting on my shelf for soooo long. I’ll read it, someday, but I can’t just make myself read something when I’m not in the mood for it, and I haven’t really been in the mood for this one, yet. I might pick it up soon, though, because the opening lines certainly got my attention.

 

Have you read this one? What did you think?

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About battybibliophile

If you’ve somehow found your way to this blog, hello! I created this blog for (mostly) book related posts. I’m not entirely certain about the potential content that will find its way here, but I have some ideas. I will probably use this space for reviewing books, posting short thoughts on what I’m reading (or planning to read), quotes, rants, etc.
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One Response to First Lines Fridays

  1. infictionalworlds says:

    That’s an intense first line!

    Liked by 1 person

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