First Lines Fridays: October 27th

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


If you’re afraid of bees, I have to warn you–there are a lot of bees in this story. In fact, there are hundreds. 


 

Interested? Keep scrolling to find out which book this is from.

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Why I’m Afraid of Bees by R.L. Stine


What it’s about:

RIGHT BRAIN. WRONG BODY.

Gary Lutz needs a vacation…from himself. Bullies are constantly beating him up. His only friend is his computer. Even his little sister doesn’t like him.
But now Gary’s dream is about to come true. He’s going to exchange bodies with another kid for a whole week.
Gary can’t wait to get a new body. Until something horrible happens. And Gary finds out his new body isn’t exactly human….

 

Cover links to goodreads

I know I read this when I was a kid, but this one didn’t stick with me like a lot of the others did. I recently got a tin with 5 of the original Goosebumps books (I’ve already re-read A Night in Terror Tower) and I can’t wait to finish re-reading all of them ❤ I’m thinking I might pick this one up this weekend, since I remember it the least.

Also, I post links for some places to buy books, with these FLF posts, but…Goosebumps are tricky sometimes, so I just linked to goodreads. I’ve had ok luck finding them at a used bookstore a couple hours away, so if you’re looking to buy, I’d suggest that because finding some of them in stores, new, is difficult :/


Did you read Goosebumps books when you were a kid?

If you did, do you remember any of your favorites?

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First Lines Fridays: September 29th

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


There was a hand in the darkness, and it held a knife. The knife had a handle of polished black bone, and a blade finer and sharper than any razor. If it sliced you, you might not even know you had been cut, not immediately. 


Interested? Keep scrolling to find out which book this is from.

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

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What it’s about:

Bod is an unusual boy who inhabits an unusual place—he’s the only living resident of a graveyard. Raised from infancy by the ghosts, werewolves, and other cemetery denizens, Bod has learned the antiquated customs of his guardians’ time as well as their ghostly teachings—such as the ability to Fade so mere mortals cannot see him.

Can a boy raised by ghosts face the wonders and terrors of the worlds of both the living and the dead? And then there are beings such as ghouls that aren’t really one thing or the other.

Goodreads | Barnes & Noble | Amazon | Book depository


Raise your hand if you knew exactly what the book was before you scrolled.

This book has been on my TBR for almost 10 years, but I finally got around to reading it, and I have to say I loved those first lines. I just finished it, but didn’t love it as much as I’d hoped. I think it was my third Gaiman book, and, while I love his writing, I also hate it a bit. Overall, though, I enjoyed The Graveyard Book, and I’ll be reading more of his books eventually.


Have you read it?

What did you think of it?

First Lines Fridays: September 22nd

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


I’m pretty much fucked.
         That’s my considered opinion.
         Fucked.
Six days into what should be the greatest two months of my life, and it’s turned into a nightmare.
 


Interested? Keep scrolling to find out which book this is from.

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The Martian by Andy Weir

18007564What it’s about:

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. 

Now, he’s sure he’ll be the first person to die there.

After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. 

Chances are, though, he won’t have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain-old “human error” are much more likely to kill him first. 

But Mark isn’t ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?

Goodreads | Barnes & Noble | Amazon | Book Depository


I have had this ebook for probably a year or two and still haven’t read it, even though I was about 97% sure I would really like it, based on what I’ve heard about it. If I’d bothered to read the first page, I probably would have read it sooner, because those are some good opening lines.

Earlier this week, I ran a poll on twitter asking people to help me choose between this and two other books, and this one came out way ahead of the others. I finally started it this morning and I am really enjoying it so far.

 


Have you read it? What did you think of it?

First Lines Fridays: September 8th

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


When all is said and done, killing my mother came easily. Dementia, as it descends, has a way of revealing the core of the person affected by it. My mother’s core was rotten like the brackish water at the bottom of a weeks-old vase of flowers. 


 

 

Interested? Keep reading to find out which book this is from.

 

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The Almost Moon by Alice Sebold

783291What it’s about:

A woman steps over the line into the unthinkable in this brilliant, powerful, and unforgettable new novel by the author of The Lovely Bones and Lucky.

For years Helen Knightly has given her life to others: to her haunted mother, to her enigmatic father, to her husband and now grown children. When she finally crosses a terrible boundary, her life comes rushing in at her in a way she never could have imagined. Unfolding over the next twenty-four hours, this searing, fast-paced novel explores the complex ties between mothers and daughters, wives and lovers, the meaning of devotion, and the line between love and hate. 

It is a challenging, moving, gripping story, written with the fluidity and strength of voice that only Alice Sebold can bring to the page.

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository


I read The Lovely Bones back in 7th or 8th grade and loved it (I have no clue how I would feel about it now, though), so, a few years ago when I found another of Sebold’s books for about $2, I pounced. Now it’s been sitting on my shelf all this time and I haven’t even peeked inside.

The other day, I decided to look it up on goodreads and discovered that it has possibly the lowest star rating of any book on my shelf/that I’ve ever read: 2.67 out of 5 stars. Wow.

Maybe I’m really weird for this, but I love looking at low start reviews of books. I usually find them more helpful than rave reviews in deciding if I want to read a book or not. After reading a bunch of things about how Sebold is disturbed for writing about a character killing her mother, how her own rape must have influenced her writing (because she writes about violent/dark/etc. topics, because obviously a woman could never write about anything like that if she hadn’t experienced violence herself 😡 ), and other things along those lines, I knew I had to read this book.

I’m a few pages in, now, and I’m not sure if I’ll finish it. I’m not bothered by the subject matter, I’m just bored so far :/

But those opening lines absolutely grabbed me, so I’m hoping I will be able to finish the book.


Have you read this one? What did you think of it?

First Lines Fridays: September 1st

first-lines-fridays

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


It was dawn, and the zombies were stumbling through the parking lot, streaming toward the massive beige box at the far end. Later they’d be resurrected by megadoses of Starbucks, but for now they were the barely living dead. 


 

 

Interested? Keep reading to find out which book this is from.

 

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Horrorstör by Grady Hendrix

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What it’s about:

Something strange is happening at the Orsk furniture superstore in Cleveland, Ohio. Every morning, employees arrive to find broken Kjerring bookshelves, shattered Glans water goblets, and smashed Liripip wardrobes. Sales are down, security cameras reveal nothing, and store managers are panicking.

To unravel the mystery, three employees volunteer to work a nine-hour dusk-till-dawn shift. In the dead of the night, they’ll patrol the empty showroom floor, investigate strange sights and sounds, and encounter horrors that defy the imagination.

A traditional haunted house story in a thoroughly contemporary setting, Horrorstör comes packaged in the form of a glossy mail order catalog, complete with product illustrations, a home delivery order form, and a map of Orsk’s labyrinthine showroom.

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository


I remember when this came out, and I knew I had to read it. I eventually bought it when the Kindle edition was on sale, and then it got sucked into the bottomless pit that is my collection of e-books :/ But it’s been on my mind a lot recently, so I’m thinking of starting it soon.


Have any of you read it? What did you think of it?

First Lines Fridays: August 25th

first-lines-fridays

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


Carolyn, blood-drenched and barefoot, walked alone down the two-lane stretch of blacktop that the Americans called Highway 78. Most of the librarians, Carolyn included, had come to think of this road as the Path of Tacos, so-called in honor of a Mexican joint they snuck out to sometimes. 


 

 

Interested? Keep reading to find out which book this is from.

 

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The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

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What it’s about:

A missing God.
A library with the secrets to the universe. 
A woman too busy to notice her heart slipping away.
 
Carolyn’s not so different from the other people around her. She likes guacamole and cigarettes and steak. She knows how to use a phone. Clothes are a bit tricky, but everyone says nice things about her outfit with the Christmas sweater over the gold bicycle shorts.  

After all, she was a normal American herself once.   

That was a long time ago, of course. Before her parents died. Before she and the others were taken in by the man they called Father. 

In the years since then, Carolyn hasn’t had a chance to get out much. Instead, she and her adopted siblings have been raised according to Father’s ancient customs. They’ve studied the books in his Library and learned some of the secrets of his power. And sometimes, they’ve wondered if their cruel tutor might secretly be God.  

Now, Father is missing—perhaps even dead—and the Library that holds his secrets stands unguarded. And with it, control over all of creation. 

As Carolyn gathers the tools she needs for the battle to come, fierce competitors for this prize align against her, all of them with powers that far exceed her own. 

But Carolyn has accounted for this. 

And Carolyn has a plan. 

The only trouble is that in the war to make a new God, she’s forgotten to protect the things that make her human.

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository


I vaguely remember when this came out, and the description hooked me enough to keep it on my radar, but I wasn’t sure enough to buy it right away. A few months ago, the Kindle edition was on sale and I grabbed it after reading a few pages in the sample. I’m still in this never-ending multi-genre slump, so I haven’t read it yet, but I’m looking forward to eventually getting to it.


If you’ve read it, I’d love to hear what you thought of it 🙂

First Lines Fridays: August 11th

first-lines-fridays

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

The Rules:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first

Finally… reveal the book!

 


Fairies will not be rushed. I know this now; know I must be patient. 


 

 

Interested? Keep reading to find out which book this is from.

 

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The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor

 

32600721What it’s about:

1917… It was inexplicable, impossible, but it had to be true—didn’t it? When two young cousins, Frances Griffiths and Elsie Wright from Cottingley, England, claim to have photographed fairies at the bottom of the garden, their parents are astonished. But when one of the great novelists of the time, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, becomes convinced of the photographs’ authenticity, the girls become a national sensation, their discovery offering hope to those longing for something to believe in amid a world ravaged by war. Frances and Elsie will hide their secret for many decades. But Frances longs for the truth to be told.

One hundred years later… When Olivia Kavanagh finds an old manuscript in her late grandfather’s bookshop she becomes fascinated by the story it tells of two young girls who mystified the world. But it is the discovery of an old photograph that leads her to realize how the fairy girls’ lives intertwine with hers, connecting past to present, and blurring her understanding of what is real and what is imagined. As she begins to understand why a nation once believed in fairies, can Olivia find a way to believe in herself?

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository


This was another goodreads giveaway win for me, and I’m so excited! I’ve always been fascinated by the Cottingley fairies story, and I’ve read a lot about it online over the years.

(I was actually supposed to start this last month and review it for release day on the 1st of August, but the unexpected ER visit and surgery kind of threw off my reading schedule :/ )